• Vocabulary / Listening / Reading: Cambridge News (with English captions)

    This is a lesson by Chris. Please read below and enable captions. Title: Cambridge Rainbow vegetarian cafe does not accept new £5 note (Original article changed by Chris) Vocabulary New £5 note (slang: fiver) Currency (noun): money Animal products (noun): material made from parts of dead animals Policy (noun): rules made by a company Tallow (noun): a type of animal fat (animal product) Bank of England: England’s central bank which controls our money Ethical (adjective): someone or something that acts in the right way (with ethics) Mystified (adjective): very confused Repulsive (adjective): disgusting Cambridge Rainbow vegetarian cafe does not accept new £5 note A vegetarian cafe is refusing to accept the new £5 note after it emerged the currency contains animal products. The owner of t...

    published: 08 Dec 2016
  • (re-sit only) Cambridge iGCSE English: Exam Question 1 (Extended Reading Paper 2-spec 0522)

    Buy my revision guides: GCSE English Language paperback http://amzn.eu/fqqLiH2 GCSE English Language eBook http://mrbruff.com/product/mr-bruffs-guide-to-gcse-language/ GCSE English Language Kindle edition http://amzn.eu/51H6EMn GCSE English Literature paperback http://amzn.eu/gtz1PX9 GCSE English Literature eBook http://mrbruff.com/product/mr-bruffs-guide-to-gcse-literature/. GCSE English Literature Kindle edition http://amzn.eu/2Ekp3Z2 And 20 other eBook guides at mrbruff.com

    published: 17 Dec 2014
  • Welcome to Cambridge

    To join The Cambridge Student Newspaper email editor@tcs.cam.ac.uk To get involved in tcsTV, email tv@tcs.cam.ac.uk Links to featured societies and events http://www.varsitytrip.com/ http://www.cuwbc.org.uk/ http://www.cubc.org.uk/contact-us/ http://www.cums.org.uk/ https://www.cus.org/ https://www.adctheatre.com/ http://www.crufc.co.uk/ http://footlights.org/ https://www.selwynsnowball.co.uk/

    published: 15 Aug 2014
  • IGCSE Cambridge Exam (First Language English):How to achieve perfect marks for the writing question

    This video will explain exactly how you can achieve the perfect A* mark for the writing question for both paper 1 and 2 of the Cambridge IGCSE. Use this as part of your general revision to help you gain perfect marks. Thanks for watching! Please subscribe and then keep revising: register for HUNDREDS of FREE videos covering English, Maths and Science for GCSE and A-Level revision at http://tuitionkit.com

    published: 12 Jun 2014
  • Duke and Duchess of Cambridge lay flowers at monument in Poland

    The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge lay flowers at the Solidarity monument alongside the former President of Poland and founder of the Solidarity movement, Lech Walesa, in Gdańsk.

    published: 18 Jul 2017
  • Katie Hopkins | Cambridge Union

    Katie Hopkins, Television Personality and Newspaper Columnist. After competing in the 2007 series of The Apprentice, Hopkins is now best known as a columnist for The Sun and the Daily Mail, and for her controversial comments about migrants, race and class. She has since appeared on I’m a CelebrityGet Me Out of Here!, Celebrity Big Brother, and Question Time. Hopkins pledged support for US President Donald Trump in December 2015, and has defended his suggestion to ban all Muslims from entering the USA. She has also dabbled in European politics, standing as a candidate in the 2009 European Parliamentary election as an independent candidate for South West England.

    published: 06 Jun 2017
  • Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: ‘What went before?'

    Session 2: What went before? What legal responses have there been in other countries, and what can be learnt from these about the prospects, requirements and effect of any new law? Professor Bernt Hugenholtz (University of Amsterdam) chairs a panel discussing these issues, comprised of Professor Michael Grünberger (University Bäyreuth), Professor Raquel Xalabarder (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya), Søren Christian Søborg Andersen (Horten), and Chris Beall (LSKS Law) Slides for this session are available at: - Professor Raquel Xalabarder: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/cipil/documents/copyright_related_rights_and_the_news_in_the_eu/Xalabarder_2016_News_IVIR.pdf - Professor Michael Grünberger: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/cipil/documents/copyright_related_rights_and_the_news_in_the_eu/G...

    published: 29 Apr 2016
  • Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: 'What else might a law do?'

    Session 4: What else might a law do? The effects on consumers, the internet, new entrants to the market, and freedom of expression. Professor Ian Hargreaves (University of Cardiff), chairs a panel discussing these issues comprised of Professor John Naughton (University of Cambridge), Agustín Reyna (BEUC), James Mackenzie (Cutbot), Professor Mireille van Eechoud (University of Amsterdam) This is a recording of a conference entitled "Conference: Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: Assessing potential new laws" held on Saturday 23rd April 2016 at the University of Amsterdam. The difficulties of commercial journalism Like music and other branches of publishing, commercial news journalism has faced radical challenges over the last two decades. There is talk of the "death of the...

    published: 29 Apr 2016
  • Cambridge IGCSE ESL: Paper 2 Exercise 7 Essay Writing May/June 2016 V2

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hermestestprep Hello, everyone! This is Mr. Abdulwahab again with some more educational videos! In this new series of videos, I will be taking on the Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language exam. I hope that this new series of videos would prove helpful to the students who are taking this exam any time soon. If you find it helpful to you and your friends, please share it so that as many would benefit from it as possible. Thank you for watching! Subscribe to stay tuned for more educational videos! Comment to let me know what you like or dislike about my approach towards the exam. Share with your friends to help others!

    published: 24 Jan 2017
  • How the Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) Writing paper is assessed

    This webinar looks at how writing is assessed in the Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) exam. The session begins with a short overview of the Writing paper and task requirements in Parts 1 and 2. The presenter will explore the writing assessment scale for CEFR Level C1 and illustrate how it is applied by using examples from candidates' scripts. In the final section of the webinar, the presenter will show some teaching ideas to help learners to improve their performance in the areas covered earlier in the session. Presenter -- Kerstin Aldred Slides Link: https://www.teachers.cambridgeesol.org/ts/digitalAssets/118977_Advanced_Writing_slides.pdf Handouts Link: https://www.teachers.cambridgeesol.org/ts/digitalAssets/118976_Advanced_Writing_handout.pdf All details correct as of September 2...

    published: 12 Sep 2013
  • Oxford And Cambridge Women's Boat Race (1965)

    Cambridge. Photo newspaper cutting and list of crew on file: Sarah Barstow, Anne Bloomer, Ruth Richardson, Elizabeth Mount, Sue Thompson, Marion Rogers, Ann Glithero, Anne Hull, Heather Wallis, (coaches) Canon J Noel Duckworth, Michael Miller, Keith Tovey. SV. The Oxford crew putting their bat into the water. SV. One of the Oxford crew. SV. The girls getting into boat. CU. One of the Oxford crew. SV. The Oxford captain spins the coin and Cambridge Captain calls wrongly. SV. The Cambridge girls getting into their boat. CU. One of the Cambridge girls. SV. Cambridge boat in mid-stream. GV. The start with Cambridge on left of picture. GV. The Oxford crew getting into difficulties. GV. The Oxford crew in foreground with the Cambridge crew now well in front. LV. The Cambridge crew. Pan to ...

    published: 13 Apr 2014
  • How to Write a Great Research Paper

    An eye-opening talk... Professor Simon Peyton Jones, Microsoft Research, gives a guest lecture on writing. Seven simple suggestions: don't wait - write, identify your key idea, tell a story, nail your contributions, put related work at the end, put your readers first, listen to your readers. Abstract of the talk Professor Simon Peyton Jones, Microsoft Research, gives a guest lecture on writing. Seven simple suggestions: don't wait - write, identify your key idea, tell a story, nail your contributions, put related work at the end, put your readers first, listen to your readers. Prof. Peyton Jones' lecture contained a lot of question and answer sessions with the audience. These have been removed from this video, cutting the original 50 minute lecture down to 30 minutes.

    published: 18 May 2013
  • Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: ‘Why are we here?’

    Session 1: Why are we here? What problems face news publishers? Why is this important? Why might we expect a new European copyright or related law to help resolve them? Professor Ian Hargreaves (University of Cardiff) chairs a panel discussing these issues, comprised of Dr Richard Danbury (University of Cambridge), Professor Dr Jan Hegemann (Raue LLP), Matt Rogerson (The Guardian), Andrew J Hughes (NLA Media Access, speaking in a personal capacity), Mark Seeley (RELX). Slides for this session are available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/cipil/documents/copyright_related_rights_and_the_news_in_the_eu/slidesNewsCopyrightconference(v.1).pdf This is a recording of a conference entitled "Conference: Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: Assessing potential new laws" held on...

    published: 29 Apr 2016
  • Cambridge, a beautiful campus

    The University of Cambridge (informally known as Cambridge University or simply as Cambridge) is a public research university located in Cambridge, England, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after the University of Oxford), and the fourth-oldest surviving university in the world. In post-nominals the university's name is abbreviated as Cantab, a shortened form of Cantabrigiensis (an adjective derived from Cantabrigia, the Latinised form of Cambridge). The university grew out of an association of scholars that was formed in 1209, early records suggest, by scholars leaving Oxford after a dispute with townsfolk. The two "ancient universities" have many common features and are often jointly referred to as Oxbridge. In addition to cultural and p...

    published: 28 Apr 2012
  • How to write the perfect newspaper article

    Whether you're revising for exams, or just looking for a quick revision guide, this useful video will help you achieve the perfect mark newspaper article. Thanks for watching! Please subscribe and then keep revising: register for HUNDREDS of FREE videos covering English, Maths and Science for GCSE and A-Level revision at http://tuitionkit.com

    published: 20 Aug 2013
  • Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: 'Could a new law help?'

    Session 3: Could a new law help? What is the economic evidence? What legal restraints would a new law have to observe? What political concerns are likely to be raised by a new law? Professor Lionel Bently (University of Cambridge), chairs a panel discussing these issues comprised of Bertin Martens (European Commission, speaking in a personal capacity), Professor Bernt Hugenholtz (University of Amsterdam), Marietje Schaake MEP This is a recording of a conference entitled "Conference: Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: Assessing potential new laws" held on Saturday 23rd April 2016 at the University of Amsterdam. The difficulties of commercial journalism Like music and other branches of publishing, commercial news journalism has faced radical challenges over the last two de...

    published: 29 Apr 2016
Vocabulary / Listening / Reading: Cambridge News (with English captions)

Vocabulary / Listening / Reading: Cambridge News (with English captions)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:50
  • Updated: 08 Dec 2016
  • views: 867
videos
This is a lesson by Chris. Please read below and enable captions. Title: Cambridge Rainbow vegetarian cafe does not accept new £5 note (Original article changed by Chris) Vocabulary New £5 note (slang: fiver) Currency (noun): money Animal products (noun): material made from parts of dead animals Policy (noun): rules made by a company Tallow (noun): a type of animal fat (animal product) Bank of England: England’s central bank which controls our money Ethical (adjective): someone or something that acts in the right way (with ethics) Mystified (adjective): very confused Repulsive (adjective): disgusting Cambridge Rainbow vegetarian cafe does not accept new £5 note A vegetarian cafe is refusing to accept the new £5 note after it emerged the currency contains animal products. The owner of the Rainbow Cafe in Cambridge has put up signs warning customers about the policy. There was anger from some vegetarians and religious groups when it was revealed the material used for the notes contains tallow - a type of animal fat. The Bank of England declined to say whether it was the law to accept the notes. The owner said she had made a "promise" to customers that the cafe was an ethical place. "Tallow is an animal product. Our whole business is based around not having anything like that here," she said. The signs have been put at the cafe entrance. She said she was "mystified" by the meat content in the currency, and added: "This is so repulsive... we are actually going to have to say that we can't accept the notes in our restaurant." Since the signs went up on Wednesday no customers had complained, she said. Other questions 1. Do you think the café is right? Why? Why not? 2. Are you a vegetarian? Why? Why not? Original news story: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-38184599 These lessons on my Youtube channel provide free educational material about British English, British pronunciation and British accent training. Please see below for links to my British English websites and notes to help you understand this lesson. My British English websites Please feel welcome to watch my free British English videos on this Youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/CJWorkman17 Please join this Facebook group to learn English: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LearnEnglishAndBritishEnglish/ Or like my British English Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/BritishEnglishPage British English on Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/103598621753924136721/+CJWorkman17/posts My Twitter account for teaching English is @UKEnglishTweets at this page: https://twitter.com/#!/UKEnglishTweets British English main website: http://www.learnbritishenglish.co.uk/ Tumblr video blog: http://www.tumblr.com/blog/learnbritishenglish British Accent Podcasts: http://britishaccentpodcasts.podomatic.com/ Skype username: BritishEnglish_Teacher Chris’s email (for Skype lessons): cjworkman17@yahoo.com
https://wn.com/Vocabulary_Listening_Reading_Cambridge_News_(With_English_Captions)
(re-sit only)  Cambridge iGCSE English: Exam Question 1 (Extended Reading Paper 2-spec 0522)

(re-sit only) Cambridge iGCSE English: Exam Question 1 (Extended Reading Paper 2-spec 0522)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:56
  • Updated: 17 Dec 2014
  • views: 114918
videos
Buy my revision guides: GCSE English Language paperback http://amzn.eu/fqqLiH2 GCSE English Language eBook http://mrbruff.com/product/mr-bruffs-guide-to-gcse-language/ GCSE English Language Kindle edition http://amzn.eu/51H6EMn GCSE English Literature paperback http://amzn.eu/gtz1PX9 GCSE English Literature eBook http://mrbruff.com/product/mr-bruffs-guide-to-gcse-literature/. GCSE English Literature Kindle edition http://amzn.eu/2Ekp3Z2 And 20 other eBook guides at mrbruff.com
https://wn.com/(Re_Sit_Only)_Cambridge_Igcse_English_Exam_Question_1_(Extended_Reading_Paper_2_Spec_0522)
Welcome to Cambridge

Welcome to Cambridge

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:54
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2014
  • views: 1396
videos
To join The Cambridge Student Newspaper email editor@tcs.cam.ac.uk To get involved in tcsTV, email tv@tcs.cam.ac.uk Links to featured societies and events http://www.varsitytrip.com/ http://www.cuwbc.org.uk/ http://www.cubc.org.uk/contact-us/ http://www.cums.org.uk/ https://www.cus.org/ https://www.adctheatre.com/ http://www.crufc.co.uk/ http://footlights.org/ https://www.selwynsnowball.co.uk/
https://wn.com/Welcome_To_Cambridge
IGCSE Cambridge Exam (First Language English):How to achieve perfect marks for the writing question

IGCSE Cambridge Exam (First Language English):How to achieve perfect marks for the writing question

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:50
  • Updated: 12 Jun 2014
  • views: 71387
videos
This video will explain exactly how you can achieve the perfect A* mark for the writing question for both paper 1 and 2 of the Cambridge IGCSE. Use this as part of your general revision to help you gain perfect marks. Thanks for watching! Please subscribe and then keep revising: register for HUNDREDS of FREE videos covering English, Maths and Science for GCSE and A-Level revision at http://tuitionkit.com
https://wn.com/Igcse_Cambridge_Exam_(First_Language_English)_How_To_Achieve_Perfect_Marks_For_The_Writing_Question
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge lay flowers at monument in Poland

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge lay flowers at monument in Poland

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:37
  • Updated: 18 Jul 2017
  • views: 1800
videos
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge lay flowers at the Solidarity monument alongside the former President of Poland and founder of the Solidarity movement, Lech Walesa, in Gdańsk.
https://wn.com/Duke_And_Duchess_Of_Cambridge_Lay_Flowers_At_Monument_In_Poland
Katie Hopkins | Cambridge Union

Katie Hopkins | Cambridge Union

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:01:45
  • Updated: 06 Jun 2017
  • views: 103121
videos
Katie Hopkins, Television Personality and Newspaper Columnist. After competing in the 2007 series of The Apprentice, Hopkins is now best known as a columnist for The Sun and the Daily Mail, and for her controversial comments about migrants, race and class. She has since appeared on I’m a CelebrityGet Me Out of Here!, Celebrity Big Brother, and Question Time. Hopkins pledged support for US President Donald Trump in December 2015, and has defended his suggestion to ban all Muslims from entering the USA. She has also dabbled in European politics, standing as a candidate in the 2009 European Parliamentary election as an independent candidate for South West England.
https://wn.com/Katie_Hopkins_|_Cambridge_Union
Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: ‘What went before?'

Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: ‘What went before?'

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:24:28
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2016
  • views: 289
videos
Session 2: What went before? What legal responses have there been in other countries, and what can be learnt from these about the prospects, requirements and effect of any new law? Professor Bernt Hugenholtz (University of Amsterdam) chairs a panel discussing these issues, comprised of Professor Michael Grünberger (University Bäyreuth), Professor Raquel Xalabarder (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya), Søren Christian Søborg Andersen (Horten), and Chris Beall (LSKS Law) Slides for this session are available at: - Professor Raquel Xalabarder: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/cipil/documents/copyright_related_rights_and_the_news_in_the_eu/Xalabarder_2016_News_IVIR.pdf - Professor Michael Grünberger: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/cipil/documents/copyright_related_rights_and_the_news_in_the_eu/Gruenberger%20Ancillary%20Right.pdf This is a recording of a conference entitled "Conference: Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: Assessing potential new laws" held on Saturday 23rd April 2016 at the University of Amsterdam. The difficulties of commercial journalism Like music and other branches of publishing, commercial news journalism has faced radical challenges over the last two decades. There is talk of the "death of the newspaper" and questions have been raised about the very future of journalism. While with music, books and films, the greatest threat to existing business models have been seen as the unauthorised and unremunerated home copying and peer-to-peer distribution, with commercial news journalism much of the challenge derives from the fact that advertising has not followed the shift of print-newspapers to the Internet. Such difficulties are compounded, from the point of view of news publishers, by the relatively free availability of news from other online sources. And they’ve been further compounded by the recent rise of social media, particularly Facebook, as a main route to the news. Questions that arise Is there sufficient rationale to alter copyright or related laws in a way that benefits news publishers? Should commercial news publishers benefit from any change in the law, given that other means exist for gathering and disseminating news? How strong is an economic case for such a right? To what extent is any economic case for change supplemented by other arguments, such as reward and natural rights arguments, and arguments about media plurality? Should European law treat news publishers in a similar way to other content producers, such as phonogram producers and broadcasters, who benefit from a related right? Would individual journalists benefit from a right afforded to news publishers, and if so, to what extent? Should news publishers benefit from levies and compensation schemes designed to benefit author-journalists? A one day conference at IViR will seek to address these questions. The conference is part of a two-year, AHRC funded project at CIPIL, Cambridge University, entitled Appraising Potential Legal Responses to Threats to the Production of News in a Digital Environment, which the IViR will kindly host and facilitate. The conference brings together an interdisciplinary combination of academics and practitioners to discuss the issue. Representatives from news producing, publishing and disseminating organizations, both traditional and online, have been invited and speakers will include Andrew Hughes from the NLA Media Access. Academic speakers include Lionel Bently and John Naughton from Cambridge; Bernt Hugenholtz and Mireille van Eechoud from IViR; Ian Hargreaves from Cardiff University; Raquel Xalabarder (UOC Barcelona) and Jan Hegemann (FU Berlin). For further information contact: Dr Richard Danbury Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law, University of Cambridge rmd59@cam.ac.uk More information: http://www.ivir.nl/newsconference2016 Shared under CC BY: CIPIL, University of Cambridge; IViR, University of Amsterdam; funded by AHRC grant H/L004704/1.
https://wn.com/Copyright,_Related_Rights_And_The_News_In_The_Eu_‘What_Went_Before_'
Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: 'What else might a law do?'

Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: 'What else might a law do?'

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:18:04
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2016
  • views: 214
videos
Session 4: What else might a law do? The effects on consumers, the internet, new entrants to the market, and freedom of expression. Professor Ian Hargreaves (University of Cardiff), chairs a panel discussing these issues comprised of Professor John Naughton (University of Cambridge), Agustín Reyna (BEUC), James Mackenzie (Cutbot), Professor Mireille van Eechoud (University of Amsterdam) This is a recording of a conference entitled "Conference: Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: Assessing potential new laws" held on Saturday 23rd April 2016 at the University of Amsterdam. The difficulties of commercial journalism Like music and other branches of publishing, commercial news journalism has faced radical challenges over the last two decades. There is talk of the "death of the newspaper" and questions have been raised about the very future of journalism. While with music, books and films, the greatest threat to existing business models have been seen as the unauthorised and unremunerated home copying and peer-to-peer distribution, with commercial news journalism much of the challenge derives from the fact that advertising has not followed the shift of print-newspapers to the Internet. Such difficulties are compounded, from the point of view of news publishers, by the relatively free availability of news from other online sources. And they’ve been further compounded by the recent rise of social media, particularly Facebook, as a main route to the news. Questions that arise Is there sufficient rationale to alter copyright or related laws in a way that benefits news publishers? Should commercial news publishers benefit from any change in the law, given that other means exist for gathering and disseminating news? How strong is an economic case for such a right? To what extent is any economic case for change supplemented by other arguments, such as reward and natural rights arguments, and arguments about media plurality? Should European law treat news publishers in a similar way to other content producers, such as phonogram producers and broadcasters, who benefit from a related right? Would individual journalists benefit from a right afforded to news publishers, and if so, to what extent? Should news publishers benefit from levies and compensation schemes designed to benefit author-journalists? A one day conference at IViR will seek to address these questions. The conference is part of a two-year, AHRC funded project at CIPIL, Cambridge University, entitled Appraising Potential Legal Responses to Threats to the Production of News in a Digital Environment, which the IViR will kindly host and facilitate. The conference brings together an interdisciplinary combination of academics and practitioners to discuss the issue. Representatives from news producing, publishing and disseminating organizations, both traditional and online, have been invited and speakers will include Andrew Hughes from the NLA Media Access. Academic speakers include Lionel Bently and John Naughton from Cambridge; Bernt Hugenholtz and Mireille van Eechoud from IViR; Ian Hargreaves from Cardiff University; Raquel Xalabarder (UOC Barcelona) and Jan Hegemann (FU Berlin). For further information contact: Dr Richard Danbury Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law, University of Cambridge rmd59@cam.ac.uk More information: http://www.ivir.nl/newsconference2016 Shared under CC BY: CIPIL, University of Cambridge; IViR, University of Amsterdam; funded by AHRC grant H/L004704/1.
https://wn.com/Copyright,_Related_Rights_And_The_News_In_The_Eu_'What_Else_Might_A_Law_Do_'
Cambridge IGCSE ESL: Paper 2 Exercise 7 Essay Writing May/June 2016 V2

Cambridge IGCSE ESL: Paper 2 Exercise 7 Essay Writing May/June 2016 V2

  • Order:
  • Duration: 20:13
  • Updated: 24 Jan 2017
  • views: 17628
videos
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hermestestprep Hello, everyone! This is Mr. Abdulwahab again with some more educational videos! In this new series of videos, I will be taking on the Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language exam. I hope that this new series of videos would prove helpful to the students who are taking this exam any time soon. If you find it helpful to you and your friends, please share it so that as many would benefit from it as possible. Thank you for watching! Subscribe to stay tuned for more educational videos! Comment to let me know what you like or dislike about my approach towards the exam. Share with your friends to help others!
https://wn.com/Cambridge_Igcse_Esl_Paper_2_Exercise_7_Essay_Writing_May_June_2016_V2
How the Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) Writing paper is assessed

How the Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) Writing paper is assessed

  • Order:
  • Duration: 43:20
  • Updated: 12 Sep 2013
  • views: 29063
videos
This webinar looks at how writing is assessed in the Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) exam. The session begins with a short overview of the Writing paper and task requirements in Parts 1 and 2. The presenter will explore the writing assessment scale for CEFR Level C1 and illustrate how it is applied by using examples from candidates' scripts. In the final section of the webinar, the presenter will show some teaching ideas to help learners to improve their performance in the areas covered earlier in the session. Presenter -- Kerstin Aldred Slides Link: https://www.teachers.cambridgeesol.org/ts/digitalAssets/118977_Advanced_Writing_slides.pdf Handouts Link: https://www.teachers.cambridgeesol.org/ts/digitalAssets/118976_Advanced_Writing_handout.pdf All details correct as of September 2013
https://wn.com/How_The_Cambridge_English_Advanced_(Cae)_Writing_Paper_Is_Assessed
Oxford And Cambridge Women's Boat Race (1965)

Oxford And Cambridge Women's Boat Race (1965)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:18
  • Updated: 13 Apr 2014
  • views: 3129
videos
Cambridge. Photo newspaper cutting and list of crew on file: Sarah Barstow, Anne Bloomer, Ruth Richardson, Elizabeth Mount, Sue Thompson, Marion Rogers, Ann Glithero, Anne Hull, Heather Wallis, (coaches) Canon J Noel Duckworth, Michael Miller, Keith Tovey. SV. The Oxford crew putting their bat into the water. SV. One of the Oxford crew. SV. The girls getting into boat. CU. One of the Oxford crew. SV. The Oxford captain spins the coin and Cambridge Captain calls wrongly. SV. The Cambridge girls getting into their boat. CU. One of the Cambridge girls. SV. Cambridge boat in mid-stream. GV. The start with Cambridge on left of picture. GV. The Oxford crew getting into difficulties. GV. The Oxford crew in foreground with the Cambridge crew now well in front. LV. The Cambridge crew. Pan to Oxford. GV. As the Cambridge crew pass the winning post. GV. Oxford going past winning post. SV. The Cambridge crew walking towards camera. (Orig. Neg.) FILM ID:3104.08 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/
https://wn.com/Oxford_And_Cambridge_Women's_Boat_Race_(1965)
How to Write a Great Research Paper

How to Write a Great Research Paper

  • Order:
  • Duration: 34:25
  • Updated: 18 May 2013
  • views: 1002492
videos
An eye-opening talk... Professor Simon Peyton Jones, Microsoft Research, gives a guest lecture on writing. Seven simple suggestions: don't wait - write, identify your key idea, tell a story, nail your contributions, put related work at the end, put your readers first, listen to your readers. Abstract of the talk Professor Simon Peyton Jones, Microsoft Research, gives a guest lecture on writing. Seven simple suggestions: don't wait - write, identify your key idea, tell a story, nail your contributions, put related work at the end, put your readers first, listen to your readers. Prof. Peyton Jones' lecture contained a lot of question and answer sessions with the audience. These have been removed from this video, cutting the original 50 minute lecture down to 30 minutes.
https://wn.com/How_To_Write_A_Great_Research_Paper
Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: ‘Why are we here?’

Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: ‘Why are we here?’

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:17:41
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2016
  • views: 308
videos
Session 1: Why are we here? What problems face news publishers? Why is this important? Why might we expect a new European copyright or related law to help resolve them? Professor Ian Hargreaves (University of Cardiff) chairs a panel discussing these issues, comprised of Dr Richard Danbury (University of Cambridge), Professor Dr Jan Hegemann (Raue LLP), Matt Rogerson (The Guardian), Andrew J Hughes (NLA Media Access, speaking in a personal capacity), Mark Seeley (RELX). Slides for this session are available at: http://resources.law.cam.ac.uk/cipil/documents/copyright_related_rights_and_the_news_in_the_eu/slidesNewsCopyrightconference(v.1).pdf This is a recording of a conference entitled "Conference: Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: Assessing potential new laws" held on Saturday 23rd April 2016 at the University of Amsterdam. The difficulties of commercial journalism Like music and other branches of publishing, commercial news journalism has faced radical challenges over the last two decades. There is talk of the "death of the newspaper" and questions have been raised about the very future of journalism. While with music, books and films, the greatest threat to existing business models have been seen as the unauthorised and unremunerated home copying and peer-to-peer distribution, with commercial news journalism much of the challenge derives from the fact that advertising has not followed the shift of print-newspapers to the Internet. Such difficulties are compounded, from the point of view of news publishers, by the relatively free availability of news from other online sources. And they’ve been further compounded by the recent rise of social media, particularly Facebook, as a main route to the news. Questions that arise Is there sufficient rationale to alter copyright or related laws in a way that benefits news publishers? Should commercial news publishers benefit from any change in the law, given that other means exist for gathering and disseminating news? How strong is an economic case for such a right? To what extent is any economic case for change supplemented by other arguments, such as reward and natural rights arguments, and arguments about media plurality? Should European law treat news publishers in a similar way to other content producers, such as phonogram producers and broadcasters, who benefit from a related right? Would individual journalists benefit from a right afforded to news publishers, and if so, to what extent? Should news publishers benefit from levies and compensation schemes designed to benefit author-journalists? A one day conference at IViR will seek to address these questions. The conference is part of a two-year, AHRC funded project at CIPIL, Cambridge University, entitled Appraising Potential Legal Responses to Threats to the Production of News in a Digital Environment, which the IViR will kindly host and facilitate. The conference brings together an interdisciplinary combination of academics and practitioners to discuss the issue. Representatives from news producing, publishing and disseminating organizations, both traditional and online, have been invited and speakers will include Andrew Hughes from the NLA Media Access. Academic speakers include Lionel Bently and John Naughton from Cambridge; Bernt Hugenholtz and Mireille van Eechoud from IViR; Ian Hargreaves from Cardiff University; Raquel Xalabarder (UOC Barcelona) and Jan Hegemann (FU Berlin). For further information contact: Dr Richard Danbury Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law, University of Cambridge rmd59@cam.ac.uk More information: http://www.ivir.nl/newsconference2016 Shared under CC BY: CIPIL, University of Cambridge; IViR, University of Amsterdam; funded by AHRC grant H/L004704/1.
https://wn.com/Copyright,_Related_Rights_And_The_News_In_The_Eu_‘Why_Are_We_Here_’
Cambridge, a beautiful campus

Cambridge, a beautiful campus

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:06
  • Updated: 28 Apr 2012
  • views: 4736
videos
The University of Cambridge (informally known as Cambridge University or simply as Cambridge) is a public research university located in Cambridge, England, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after the University of Oxford), and the fourth-oldest surviving university in the world. In post-nominals the university's name is abbreviated as Cantab, a shortened form of Cantabrigiensis (an adjective derived from Cantabrigia, the Latinised form of Cambridge). The university grew out of an association of scholars that was formed in 1209, early records suggest, by scholars leaving Oxford after a dispute with townsfolk. The two "ancient universities" have many common features and are often jointly referred to as Oxbridge. In addition to cultural and practical associations as a historic part of British society, they have a long history of rivalry with each other. Cambridge has performed consistently in various league tables over the years, achieving the top spot in the world according to the QS World University Rankings in both 2010 and 2011; in 2012, the same editors ranked Cambridge second. Other results include a sixth place in the world in the 2011 Times Higher Education World University Rankings, and a fifth position in the world (and first in Europe) in the 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities. Furthermore, Cambridge regularly contends with Oxford for first place in UK league tables. In the two most recently published rankings of UK universities by The Guardian newspaper, Cambridge was ranked first. In 2011, Cambridge ranked third, after Harvard and MIT, in the Times Higher Education World Reputation Rankings. Graduates of the university have won a total of 65 Nobel Prizes, the most of any university in the world. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Trani, Puglia, Italy" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1pjg4PtPUo -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
https://wn.com/Cambridge,_A_Beautiful_Campus
How to write the perfect newspaper article

How to write the perfect newspaper article

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:49
  • Updated: 20 Aug 2013
  • views: 149505
videos
Whether you're revising for exams, or just looking for a quick revision guide, this useful video will help you achieve the perfect mark newspaper article. Thanks for watching! Please subscribe and then keep revising: register for HUNDREDS of FREE videos covering English, Maths and Science for GCSE and A-Level revision at http://tuitionkit.com
https://wn.com/How_To_Write_The_Perfect_Newspaper_Article
Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: 'Could a new law help?'

Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: 'Could a new law help?'

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:34:38
  • Updated: 29 Apr 2016
  • views: 207
videos
Session 3: Could a new law help? What is the economic evidence? What legal restraints would a new law have to observe? What political concerns are likely to be raised by a new law? Professor Lionel Bently (University of Cambridge), chairs a panel discussing these issues comprised of Bertin Martens (European Commission, speaking in a personal capacity), Professor Bernt Hugenholtz (University of Amsterdam), Marietje Schaake MEP This is a recording of a conference entitled "Conference: Copyright, related rights and the news in the EU: Assessing potential new laws" held on Saturday 23rd April 2016 at the University of Amsterdam. The difficulties of commercial journalism Like music and other branches of publishing, commercial news journalism has faced radical challenges over the last two decades. There is talk of the "death of the newspaper" and questions have been raised about the very future of journalism. While with music, books and films, the greatest threat to existing business models have been seen as the unauthorised and unremunerated home copying and peer-to-peer distribution, with commercial news journalism much of the challenge derives from the fact that advertising has not followed the shift of print-newspapers to the Internet. Such difficulties are compounded, from the point of view of news publishers, by the relatively free availability of news from other online sources. And they’ve been further compounded by the recent rise of social media, particularly Facebook, as a main route to the news. Questions that arise Is there sufficient rationale to alter copyright or related laws in a way that benefits news publishers? Should commercial news publishers benefit from any change in the law, given that other means exist for gathering and disseminating news? How strong is an economic case for such a right? To what extent is any economic case for change supplemented by other arguments, such as reward and natural rights arguments, and arguments about media plurality? Should European law treat news publishers in a similar way to other content producers, such as phonogram producers and broadcasters, who benefit from a related right? Would individual journalists benefit from a right afforded to news publishers, and if so, to what extent? Should news publishers benefit from levies and compensation schemes designed to benefit author-journalists? A one day conference at IViR will seek to address these questions. The conference is part of a two-year, AHRC funded project at CIPIL, Cambridge University, entitled Appraising Potential Legal Responses to Threats to the Production of News in a Digital Environment, which the IViR will kindly host and facilitate. The conference brings together an interdisciplinary combination of academics and practitioners to discuss the issue. Representatives from news producing, publishing and disseminating organizations, both traditional and online, have been invited and speakers will include Andrew Hughes from the NLA Media Access. Academic speakers include Lionel Bently and John Naughton from Cambridge; Bernt Hugenholtz and Mireille van Eechoud from IViR; Ian Hargreaves from Cardiff University; Raquel Xalabarder (UOC Barcelona) and Jan Hegemann (FU Berlin). For further information contact: Dr Richard Danbury Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law, University of Cambridge rmd59@cam.ac.uk More information: http://www.ivir.nl/newsconference2016 Shared under CC BY: CIPIL, University of Cambridge; IViR, University of Amsterdam; funded by AHRC grant H/L004704/1.
https://wn.com/Copyright,_Related_Rights_And_The_News_In_The_Eu_'Could_A_New_Law_Help_'